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Robert Silverberg


To be Continued: 1953-58

The Collected Stories of Robert Silverberg: Book 1

Robert Silverberg

First in a projected eight volumes collecting all of the short stories and novellas SF Grandmaster Silverberg wants to take their place on the permanent shelf. Each volume will be roughly 150,000-200,000 words, with classics and lesser known gems alike. Mr. Silverberg has also graced us with a lengthy introduction and extensive story notes for each tale.

The Subterranean Collected Silverberg will vary greatly from the UK trade paperback series published in the 1990s. Due to the publisher's desire to limit the series to six volumes, many stories and, especially, novellas, could not be included. The Subterranean Collected Silverberg will be the definitive set.

Table of Contents:

  • Introduction
  • Gorgon Planet
  • The Road to Nightfall
  • The Silent Colony
  • Absolutely Inflexible
  • The MacAuley Circuit
  • The Songs of Summer
  • To Be Continued
  • Alaree
  • The Artifact Business
  • Collecting Team
  • A Man of Talent
  • One-Way Journey
  • Sunrise on Mercury
  • World of a Thousand Colors
  • Warm Man
  • Blaze of Glory
  • Why?
  • The Outbreeders
  • The Man Who Never Forgot
  • There Was an Old Woman
  • The Iron Chancellor
  • Ozymandias
  • Counterpart
  • Delivery Guaranteed

From Publishers Weekly

"Beginning with his very first sale, "Gorgon Planet," Hugo and Nebula award-winner Silverberg (A Time of Changes) collects 24 stories from the prolific first five years of his career (1953-1958), each piece with a lively headnote about its genesis, magazine venue and editor... Though none of his best-known or award-winning stories are included, these selections, which Silverberg deems the best of his early era, illustrate his apprenticeship and presage the Grand Master he has become."

From SF Site:

"And there is a consistent ambition which clearly drives most of the stories here. All of this is unusual in the pulp science fiction of the time, and while they would lead to bigger and better things for Silverberg they also mean that these early efforts still retain interest for the reader today."

From Green Man Review:

"Of equal interest--and value--are Silverberg's introductions to each story. They become, as one reads along, a history not only of the early days of Silverberg's career (he sold his first story at age eighteen and was writing steadily throughout his college years), but a glimpse at a unique period in the history of the field: the Golden Age, when editors such as Campbell, Boucher, and Gold were shaping the future of this particular brand of literature and leaving behind the days of the pulp-formula story in favor of the literary explosion that happened in the 1960s and 1970s."

To the Dark Star: 1962-69

The Collected Stories of Robert Silverberg: Book 2

Robert Silverberg

This story, "To See the Invisible Man," written in June of 1962, marks the beginning of my real career as a science-fiction writer, I think. The 1953-58 stories collected in To Be Continued, the first of this series of volumes, are respectable professional work, some better than others but all of them at least minimally acceptable--but most of them could have been written by just about anyone. Aside from a few particularly ambitious items, they were designed to slip unobtrusively into the magazines of their time, efficiently providing me with regular paychecks. But now, by freeing me from the need to calculate my way around the risk of rejection, Fred Pohl allowed--indeed, required--me to reach as deep into my literary resources as I was capable of doing. I knew that unless I gave him my very best, the wonderful guaranteed-sale deal I had with him would vanish as quickly as it had appeared. Therefore I would reach deeper and deeper, in the years ahead, until I had moved so far away from my youthful career as a hack writer that latecomers would find it hard to believe that I had been emotionally capable of writing all that junk, let alone willing to do it. In "To See the Invisible Man" the distinctive Silverberg fictional voice is on display for just about the first time.

--Robert Silverberg

Table of Contents:

  • Introduction
  • To See The Invisible Man
  • The Pain Peddlers
  • Neighbor
  • The Sixth Palace
  • Flies
  • Halfway House
  • To The Dark Star
  • Hawksbill Station
  • Passengers
  • Bride 91
  • Going Down Smooth
  • Fangs of the TREES
  • Ishmael in Love
  • Ringing the Changes
  • Sundance
  • How It Was When the Past Went Away
  • A Happy Day in 2381
  • (Now + n, Now - n )
  • After the Myths Went Home
  • The Pleasure of Their Company
  • We Know Who We Are

Something Wild is Loose: 1969-72

The Collected Stories of Robert Silverberg: Book 3

Robert Silverberg

"The world that these stories sprang from was the troubled, bewildering, dangerous, and very exciting world of those weird years when the barriers were down and the future was rushing into the present with the force of a river unleashed. But of course I think these stories speak to our times, too, and that most of them will remain valid as we go staggering onward through the brave new world of the twenty-first century. I am not one of those who believes that all is lost and the end is nigh. Like William Faulkner, I do think we will somehow endure and prevail against increasingly stiff odds.

"A great many strange and dizzying things happen to the characters in these sixteen stories, and in the fourteen stories of the 1972-73 volume that will follow. The reader who makes the journey from beginning to end of all thirty stories will be taken on many a curious trip, that I promise--as was their author during the years when they were being written."

--Robert Silverberg, from the Introduction

Table of Contents:

From Publishers Weekly (Starred Review):

"This third of a projected eight volumes of Grand Master Silverberg's short form fiction focuses on his literary output from 1969 to 1972. Many of the 16 stories share what Silverberg describes as the era's "Day-Glo splendor" and take a questioning, cynical tone, often with discontented characters searching for some kind of transcendence... Longtime fans and new readers alike will cherish this collection."

From Booklist:

"Silverberg wrote several novels and fewer short stories in the period this volume covers, during which losing his house in a 1968 fire and responding to the social and political turmoil of the 1960s affected his writing. Nevertheless, he produced such widely recognized classics as 'The Feast of St. Dionysus,' 'Good News from the Vatican,' 'Caught in the Organ Draft,' 'Thomas the Proclaimer,' and 'Going.'"

Trips: 1972-73

The Collected Stories of Robert Silverberg: Book 4

Robert Silverberg

The stories here, all of them written between March of 1972 and November of 1973, mark a critical turning point in my career. Those who know the three earlier volumes have traced my evolution from a capable journeyman, very young and as much concerned with paying the rent as he was to advancing the state of the art, into a serious, dedicated craftsman now seeking to leave his mark on science fiction in some significant way. Throughout the decade of the 1960s I had attempted to grow and evolve within the field of writing I loved--building on the best that went before me, the work of Theodore Sturgeon and James Blish and Cyril Kornbluth and Jack Vance and Philip K. Dick and half a dozen others whose great stories had been beacons beckoning me onward--and then, as I reached my own maturity, now trying to bring science fiction along with me into a new realm of development, hauling it along even farther out of its pulp-magazine origins toward what I regarded as a more resonant and evocative kind of visionary storytelling.

--Robert Silverberg, from his introduction

Table of Contents:

  • Introduction
  • In the Group
  • Getting Across
  • The Science Fiction Hall of Fame
  • A Sea of Faces
  • The Dybbuk of Mazel Tov IV
  • Breckenridge and the Continuum
  • Capricorn Games
  • Ship-Sister, Star-Sister
  • This is the Road
  • Trips
  • Born with the Dead
  • Schwartz Between the Galaxies
  • In the House of Double Minds

From Publishers Weekly (Starred Review):

"Thought-provoking and deeply ironic, these stories and the others in this volume are as powerful today as they were when they first saw print."

From Booklist:

"The introductions to the whole volume and each story represent new installments of Silverberg's literary autobiography and make it more obvious that the series is an invaluable resource to sf readers and scholars alike."

From SF Site:

"'Born with the Dead,' which went on to win a Nebula Award for Silverberg, is perhaps the most successful of the stories included, but others, such as the titular 'Trips' or 'The Dybbuk of Mazel Tov IV' stand the test of time. These stories show that no matter how much Silverberg was feeling that times were changing around him, he could still tell a good story."

The Palace at Midnight: 1980-82

The Collected Stories of Robert Silverberg: Book 5

Robert Silverberg

Somehow, for all my outward pretence of cold-eyed professionalism, all my insistence that writing is simply a job like any other, I've discovered to my surprise and chagrin that there's more than that going on around here, that I write as much out of karmic necessity and some inescapable inner need to rededicate my own skills constantly to my--what? My craft? My art? My profession? I wrote these stories because the only way of earning a living I have ever had has been by writing, but mainly, I have to admit, I wrote these stories because I couldn't not write them. Well, so be it. They involved me in a lot of hard work, but for me, at least, the results justify the toil. I'm glad I wrote them. Writing them, it turns out, was important for me, and even pleasurable, in a curiously complex after-the-fact kind of way. May they give you pleasure now too.

--Robert Silverberg, from his Introduction

Table of Contents:

  • Introduction
  • Our Lady of the Sauropods
  • Waiting for the Earthquake
  • The Regulars
  • The Far Side of the Bell-Shaped Curve
  • A Thousand Paces Along the Via Dolorosa
  • How They Pass the Time in Pelpel
  • The Palace at Midnight
  • The Man Who Floated in Time
  • Gianni
  • The Pope of the Chimps
  • Thesme and the Ghayrog
  • At the Conglomeroid Cocktail Party
  • The Trouble with Sempoanga
  • Jennifer's Lover
  • Not Our Brother
  • Gate of Horn, Gate of Ivory
  • Dancers in the Time-Flux
  • Needle in a Timestack
  • Amanda and the Alien
  • Snake and Ocean, Ocean and Snake
  • The Changeling
  • Basileus
  • Homefaring

From Publishers Weekly:

"This superb volume collects nearly two dozen of SFWA Grand Master Silverberg's best short stories... With exquisite takes on common themes like time travel and transcendent experiences, these stories represent some of the best and most sophisticated science fiction of the early 1980s."

From Booklist:

"The volume opens with a classic, 'Our Lady of the Sauropods,' and ends with one of the best-ever sf stories about intelligent lobsters (!), 'Homecoming.' In between are many stories about time travel, many done for Playboy, and some done because the author, who considers himself a working writer rather than an 'artist,' simply couldn't NOT write them."

From SF Crowsnest:

"These are quiet, serene, cerebral stories by a master of the genre, flawlessly written and well worth a look. Highly recommended."

Multiples: 1983-87

The Collected Stories of Robert Silverberg: Book 6

Robert Silverberg

By the time this present group of stories was written I had passed through the cultural turbulence that engulfed nearly everyone's life in the wild, stormy period we know as "the Sixties," which for me had actually lasted from 1968 to 1974 or 1975. I had come through my own angry four-year-long retirement from writing in the middle 1970s, and was working again at a steady pace, though not with the frenetic prolificacy of the pre-retirement years. At the beginning of this period my personal life was still pretty chaotic, a carryover from all that Sixties madness, and plenty of new chaos was going to descend on me while some of these stories were written, but I was tiptoeing toward an escape from the various messes that were complicating my life, and by the time the last five stories of this volume were being written I was heading into the stability of my second marriage.

--Robert Silverberg, from his Introduction

Table of Contents:

From Publishers Weekly:

"...this volume gives fans and scholars a closer look at some of Silverberg's best work, as he explores classic science fiction themes of alienation, exploration, and humanity."

From SFCrowsnest:

"Many of the stories herein were much praised and included in 'Best Of-' anthologies for the year they appeared, deservedly so. I think Silverberg is probably the greatest SF writer ever, perhaps slightly too sophisticated to achieve the popular appeal of some others. This is a brilliant collection from a gifted writer and deserves a place on the bookshelf or the electronic reading device."

From SFSite:

"Virtually all of the stories included in this volume were amongst the best science fiction written in the mid-1980s, and many were indeed nominated and/or won various awards. Robert Silverberg has created here tales of emotional impact and intellectual depth that should be avidly perused by every serious science fiction reader. I look forward to future volumes in the series."

We Are for the Dark: 1987-90

The Collected Stories of Robert Silverberg: Book 7

Robert Silverberg

The stories collected here, written between August of 1987 and May of 1990, demonstrate that I still believe in the classical unities. Of course, what seems to us a unity now might not have appeared that way when H. G. Wells was writing his wonderful stories in the nineteenth century. Wells might have argued that my "To the Promised Land" is built around two speculative fantasy assumptions, one that the Biblical Exodus from Egypt never happened, the other that it is possible to send rocketships to other worlds. But in fact we've seen plenty of rocketships to other worlds by now, so only my story's alternative-world speculation remains fantasy today. Technically speaking the space-travel element of the plot has become part of the given; it's the other big assumption that forms the central matter of the story.

--Robert Silverberg, from his Introduction

Table of Contents:

From Publishers Weekly:

"In 'The Dead Man's Eyes,' a jealous husband goes on the run after the thoughtless murder of his wife's lover. Anorexia is the means to a computer-obsessed boy's end in 'Chip Runner.' Hugo-winner 'Enter a Soldier. Later: Enter Another' and 'A Sleep and a Forgetting' explore the issues that might arise if scientists created the technology to recreate famous men from history. Alternate history is also represented; 'To the Promised Land' considers what the 20th century would be like if the Roman Empire hadn't fallen, and "Lion Time in Timbuctoo" examines a world where the Black Death has completely changed the fortunes of the world's great empires."

From SF Site:

"We Are For the Dark doesn't exhaust Silverberg's work in the late 80s, and, of course, in the more than twenty years since 'A Tip on a Turtle' was published in Amazing Stories, Silverberg has published more than fifty additional stories, leaving several additional volumes in the series, each of which will demonstrate that Silverberg continues to be innovative in his story-telling."

Hot Times in Magma City: 1990-95

The Collected Stories of Robert Silverberg: Book 8

Robert Silverberg

The stories in this volume were written between July of 1990 and March of 1995--the second half of the fifth decade of my career as a science-fiction writer. I don't think I could have imagined, when I began that career in the early 1950s, that science-fiction publishing would evolve the way it did over the next forty years.

Here, then, is the cream of the Silverberg output, 1990-95. I suppose I wrote more short stories in the first six months of 1957 than in that entire six-year period; but so be it. It's a different world today. I look back nostalgically on the small-town atmosphere of the era in which I began my career, and there are times when I'd be glad to "call back yesterday, bid time return." As Shakespeare pointed out, though, that can't be done. The one recourse is the one I have chosen, which is to soldier staunchly onward through the years, come what may, writing a story or two here and a book there, while the world changes out of all recognition around me. And so--to leap neatly from the Bard of Avon to F. Scott Fitzgerald--"so we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past."

--Robert Silverberg, from his Introduction

Table of Contents:

From Publishers Weekly:

"Dense with colorful settings, thoughtful characters, and Silverberg's usual painstaking attention to detail, these stories reveal a master of the genre comfortable with what he does best."

From Booklist:

"Silverberg has an inimitable voice, informed by mythology, history, and science. He puts together entertaining yarns about all kinds of worlds, from recognizable variations on our own to much stranger places. 'Hot Times in Magma City' is a short piece about the harsh work of fighting volcanoes in Los Angeles. 'Thebes of the Hundred Gates' is a time-travel story in a classic vein, with just the right level of shock at seeing history come to life. 'Crossing into the Empire' isn't quite a time-travel story, but it's got that same historical bent. 'The Martian Invasion Diaries of Henry James' is something only Silverberg would think of--and yet this particular revision of the classic Wells tale is thoroughly entertaining."

The Millennium Express: 1995-2009

The Collected Stories of Robert Silverberg: Book 9

Robert Silverberg

But, for all that, I went on writing short fiction all through the seventh and eighth decades of my life, and though I'm not very active these days, I would still pay attention if someone were to approach me with an interesting and challenging short-story project, or if some absolutely irresistible story idea were to come into my mind. I will not, at this point, try to claim that the stories that are collected here are the last short stories I will ever write. Surely some editor, in the years ahead, will tickle my imagination with a proposal I can't resist. But I doubt that will be happening very often; and, meanwhile, here's the harvest of the fourteen years that began in 1995--not an enormous number of stories, no, but stories nevertheless that I think are worth reading and reprinting.

--Robert Silverberg, from his Introduction

Table of Contents:

  • Introduction
  • Diana of the Hundred Breasts
  • Beauty in the Night
  • Call Me Titan
  • The Tree That Grew From the Sky
  • The Church at Monte Saturno
  • Hanosz Prime Goes to Old Earth
  • The Millennium Express
  • Travelers
  • The Colonel Returns to the Stars
  • The Eater of Dreams
  • A Piece of the Great World
  • Against the Current
  • The True Vintage of Erzuine Thale
  • Defenders of the Frontier
  • The Prisoner
  • Smithers and the Ghost of the Thar

The Collected Stories of Robert Silverberg: Volume 1: Secret Sharers

The Collected Stories of Robert Silverberg (Bantam): Book 1

Robert Silverberg

Intended to be the first volume in a series collection of Siverberg's short fiction. It never progressed beyond the first volume.

Table of Contents:

  • Introduction - essay
  • Homefaring - (1983) - novella
  • Basileus - (1983) - short story
  • Dancers in the Time-Flux - (1983) - short story
  • Gate of Horn, Gate of Ivory - (1984) - short story
  • Amanda and the Alien - (1983) - short story
  • Snake and Ocean, Ocean and Snake - (1984) - short story
  • Tourist Trade - (1984) - novelette
  • Multiples - (1983) - short story
  • Against Babylon - (1986) - novelette
  • Symbiont - (1985) - novelette
  • Sailing to Byzantium - (1985) - novella
  • Sunrise on Pluto - (1985) - short story
  • Hardware - (1987) - short story
  • Hannibal's Elephants - (1988) - novelette
  • The Pardoner's Tale - (1987) - short story
  • The Iron Star - (1987) - novelette
  • The Secret Sharer - (1987) - novella
  • House of Bones - (1988) - short story
  • The Dead Man's Eyes - (1988) - short story
  • Chip Runner - (1989) - short story
  • To the Promised Land - (1989) - short story
  • The Asenion Solution - (1989) - short story
  • A Sleep and a Forgetting - (1989) - short story
  • Enter a Soldier. Later: Enter Another - (1989) - novelette

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